Tag Archives: champs

Emergency Pet First Aid Kit

17 Aug


You can never be too prepared for an emergency! To prepare for any unpredictable pet emergency, have a designated bag with the following items. With the assistance of a veterinarian over the phone, these items can help to save and prolong your pets life in danger.

I hope you are all having a fantastic summer!

– Gauze

– Non stick bandages

– Adhesive white tape (do not use band aids)

– Bar of Ivory Soap

– Activated charcoal

– Peroxide

– Digital rectal thermometer

– Skunk off

– Triple antibiotic ointment

– Benadryl capsules (25mg)

– Eye dropper

– Muzzle or towel (do not use if pet is vomiting)

– Leash

– Stretcher (door, board, blanket or floor mat)

– Rubbing alcohol

– Eye wash (saline solution)

– Hydrocortisone acetate cream

– Phone numbers for RDVM, emergency room, and poison control

Uhoh! – Heat Stroke

24 Jun

Summer is here, and so is the heat! Here are a couple of tips to prevent pet heat stroke during these hot months: 

  • Never, ever, ever leave your pet in car on a hot or humid day – not even “for a minute.” Cars are like greenhouses, they trap in all the heat! If you need to run errands, leave your pet at home in a comfortable environment. Hot temperatures can be fatal for your pet. 
  • Symptoms of heat stroke include: 
    • Unusual loud and rapid breathing
    • High rectal temperature
    • Extreme thirst
    • Weakness and fatigue
    • Vomiting
    • Dizziness or confusion
    • A bright red tongue with pale gums
    • Loss of elasticity in skin when pinched
    • Difficulty breathing or panting
    • Collapse
    • Coma
    • Thick saliva
    • Increased heart rate

If you find that your pet is suffering from heat stroke, follow these steps:

  1. Move the animal to a shaded area
  2. Place cold, wet towels around your pet’s neck and head, but be sure to not cover up their nose or mouth.
  3. Slowly pour cold water over your pet’s body. Do not cool your pet off too quickly – it must be a slow process. 
  4. Use a digital rectal thermometer to take your pet’s temperature. Heat stroke patients usually have temperatures about 105 degrees. Do not cool your pet below 102 degrees.
  5. When your pet is getting back to normal, give him/her a small quantity of water to drink to help with their dehydration. 
  6. Contact your local vet to get advice on what to do next. Although your pet may not show external signs of heat stroke, there can be internal damage. It is always best to schedule a veterinary appointment. 

Heat Stroke Dog

Dogs do not sweat like humans do; they release heat through panting and sweating through their foot pads and nose.

It is very important to keep your pets in a comfortable environment during these next couple of hot months.

I hope you all have a COOL summer!

Picture from: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_GTU_nOCsE-s/SH4Od0yjguI/AAAAAAAACdw/4VSN3elnX20/s400/IMG_0526_poor_dog_closeup.jpg

Turtle vs. Tortoise

1 Apr

Image

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Cold Weather Tips

28 Dec

13 Winter Weather Tips:

blacksnowflakes

1) Keep your pets inside – They can freeze, become lost, stolen, or injured.

 

2) During the winter, outdoor cats sometimes sleep under the hoods of cars. If there are outdoor cats in your neighborhood, loudly bang on the car hood before starting the engine – this will give the cat a chance to escape before being injured by the fan belt.

 

3) Keep your dog on a leash! You must keep your dog leashed at all times, especially during a snowstorm. Dogs can lose their sense of smell and easily become lost. More dogs are lost during the winter than any other season, so make sure you dog is properly identified with a collar.

 

4) Wipe off your dogs legs and stomach when he comes out of sleet, snow or ice. If he ingests salt, antifreeze or other chemicals when licking his paws, he can be poisoned. Also, his paw pads may bleed from the encrusted ice.

 

5) Never shave your dog down to the skin during the winter months. A longer coat will provide more warmth. Rather, lightly trim longer haired dogs to minimize the clinging of ice balls, salt crystals and de-icing chemicals.

 

6) When you bathe your dog in the winter, be sure to completely dry him off before taking him for a walk or putting him outside. When you go for a walk, be sure to bring a towel to clean off irritated paws, or put booties on your dog to minimize contact with chemicals.

 

7) If you have a short-haired dog, then get him a coat or sweater to keep him warm and retain body heat.

 

8) Never leave your pet alone in a car during cold weather – it traps in the cold air, acting as a refrigerator, and your pet can freeze to death.

 

9) Clean up any and all antifreeze. Opt for a product containing propylene glycol, rather than ethylene glycol.

 

10) Massage petroleum jelly into paw pads before going outside will help to protect the paw from salts. This also helps to heal chapped paws.

 

11) Brush your pet regularly to get rid of dead hair and to stimulate blood circulation. This will improve the skin’s overall condition.

 

12) Pets burn extra energy while trying to stay warm in the winter. Be sure to give your pet a little extra food and water to keep him feed and well-hydrated, but be sure not to overfeed.


13) If the weather is too cold for you, then it is too cold for your pet.

Hurricane Sandy Shelters – Pet Friendly

31 Oct

As you may know, Hurricane Sandy recently ravaged the East Coast with high winds, rain, and an intense tidal surge. Many of those who were forced to evacuate made their way to an evacuee shelter. Thankfully, NYC shelters are pet friendly. If you are forced to evacuate, it is very important to take your pets along with you to these shelters. If your home is not fit to live in, or is not safe for you, then it is not safe for your pets. For all those affected by Sandy, please stay safe during the remainder of the storm, and the cleanup process. 

Beware: Down power lines and debris can be dangerous. Please be sure to keep your pets away from these hazards.

Hope all of you are safe and well!

More blog posts are coming soon.

Picture: http://www.humanesociety.org/assets/images/270×224/animals/dogs/dog_bodhi_270x224.jpg

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